Current, Past, Future Exhibitions

Current Exhibitions


WINTER

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Outtakes
bleacher + everard photography
November 22, 2014 – January 25, 2015


Reception: November 22, 2014 5:00-6:30 p.m.

Katie Bleacher and Dean Everard are the artists behind Outtakes. This New York City based photography team specializes in celebrity, editorial and commercial corporate assignments. With a wide variety of jobs ranging from covers of magazines to advertising campaigns, Katie and Dean collaborate with some of the top designers and creative directors in the industry.

The photographers work together and bring different perspectives to the project. Each is personable and professional and each develops a special sense with the subject of their shoot. Interestingly, Katie and Dean do not identify which images were shot by the one or other.

Image: Kate Beckinsale cover and fashion shoot for Harper's Bazaar Russia








Steven Rockefeller
A Park Bench View
October 23, 2014 - January 4, 2015

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Reception: Thursday, October 23, 2014 5:30-7:00 p.m.

Photographer Steven Rockefeller transports viewers to another place and time through the visual environment. The long-exposure high definition video “pictures” present a variety of calming images that immerse the viewer within the scene for extended periods. Images fill a variety of screens that enable participants to escape to the Virgin Islands, explore the landscape of Norway, admire the majestic Hudson River or walk the streets of Shanghai while seated or lying on comforting furniture. The soothing and reassuring experience invites the viewer to release the tensions of the everyday while blissfully focusing on the beauty and serenity of unusual, mysterious and exotic locations.







Nathaniel Donnett
Alone in My Four Cornered Room
October 23, 2014 - January 4, 2015

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Reception: Thursday, October 23, 2014 5:30-7:00 p.m.

The title of the show, “Alone in My Four Cornered Room,” references a lyric from the 1991 classic hip-hop song, “My Mind’s Playing Tricks on Me,” by trio The Geto Boys. The song, like Donnett’s works explore isolation, paranoia, and identity in which perception of self and self-knowledge do not always match. In this way, Donnett takes up a strategy that has fortified hip-hop: referencing back to others in order to assemble links and connections. Both The Geto Boy and Donnett are exploring self-doubt, safety, and psychological well-being in the face of “double consciousness.” The works in this show represent Donnett’s investments in examining the entangled relationships between society, the art world, and identity. By exploring experiences of isolation, loneliness, and social stigma, and self -determination, Donnett restores and reclaims the humanity of African Americans living complex emotional lives.

Donnett’s layered works defy singular description, rather they are purposefully resistant to either/or interpretations or linear narratives. Donnett’s work is presenting us with both/and narratives in which as viewer we have a small window in which to glimpse the vertinginous experience of being both erased and highly visible – to be forced to know oneself based on the fears others might have of you. Donnett refers to this entangled interaction between the self and society as projections, noting that many of the notions we have about each other are based on narrow narratives or misinformation. Donnett’s work suggests that none of us are safe from internalizing misperceptions of others – even the misperceptions of our own identities and selves – and he explores how very challenging, complicated, and tangled such experiences can be. His carefully crafted work plays with the distance between self-knowledge and self-perception, while investigating the spaces where art, music, identity, history, the Black imagination, culture, the self, and standards of beauty may be explored – and even challenged. Donnett’s use of such diverse materials gestures toward the improvisation he highlights as part of African American culture.

Image: Scotomas Are Larger Than They Appear, by Nathaniel Donnett



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Palace Theater
A Staged Reflection, 1922 – 2014

November 22, 2014 – February 1, 2015


Reception: November 22, 2014 5:00-6:30 p.m.

This exhibition will highlight the 10-year anniversary of the theater’s reopening after restoration and include a timeline of historic milestones dating from the theater’s 1922 opening. The exhibit will include photographs, documents, ephemera, historical objects, excerpts from oral history interviews and personal stories.












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Noah and His Ark
November 22, 2014 - March 1, 2015


Toy arks were favorite gifts for parents to give to their children. A popular toy in the 19th century, the ark was considered a suitable plaything because it was based on a Bible story. The exhibit features a 9-foot long relief ark as well as toy arks with animals.






In Search of Charles Island
August 14 – May 24, 2015


Opening Reception: Thursday, August 14, 2014 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Milford has been a popular vacation spot for residents of the Naugatuck Valley for over 150 years. Mid-nineteenth century, Waterbury button manufacturer Elizur Prichard owned the island, where he and his daughter, Sarah Prichard ran a hotel resort. Miss Prichard later donated the family’s papers to the Mattatuck Museum. Photographs, ephemera and historical objects tell the colorful story of Charles Island, including the legend of a pirate and buried treasure!


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